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What to Look for and What to Avoid When Selecting the Perfect Home

What to Look for and What to Avoid When Selecting the Perfect Home

You don’t have to be a first-time homebuyer to be blinded by love at first sight… with a home that is. Any excited buyer can see a perfect layout, colors or other options, then fail to notice structural problems, an overly-aged roof or other costly repairs that need to be completed in the short-term future.

So, what is a buyer to do to make sure they find Mr. or Miss Right Home when looks can sometimes be deceiving?

Here are a few things to look for - and some to avoid - in your search for a perfect match:

Start at the Foundation – You’ve heard the saying that “true beauty lies within.” Well, when it comes to finding a structurally-sound home, true beauty lies within the basement. Make the foundation the first thing you look at when you’re searching for the perfect new home. If you see cracks in the concrete or stone foundation, it may be wise to fly that red flag and move on to the next home. Foundation cracks often fall to the top of priority “fix” lists and the repairs can be costly.

Examine that Hot Feeling or Cold Shoulder – You’re not playing a literal game of “hot and cold” with a new home, but you do need to take a closer look at each new prospect’s heating and cooling system. A new home may be full of things you love; but if it is also full of an old HVAC system, you may be looking at dumping thousands of dollars into it just to bring it up to today’s energy-efficient standards.

Gauge your Connectivity – We’re not saying that you shouldn’t consider a May-December romance when it comes to a new home, but if you’re looking at older homes, you also better consider scoping out the electrical system before you make a move on it. Replacing outdated wiring can carry a hefty price tag that may have you asking if the home’s looks are worth the effort!

Look for Love in All the Right Places – Location is extremely important when you’re selecting the perfect home; so, consider just where you plan to meet “the one.” There are visual things that you may not be in love with in a home; but, those things are easy to change. If you don’t love a certain neighborhood or don’t think you’ll be crazy about the neighbors you meet on a home search, rule out that picture-perfect home right away. A coat of paint can change a room’s appearance, but no amount of paint will make the grass any greener when it comes to your neighborhood.

Determine Your Deal-breakers – It is easy to go into a relationship with a new home knowing all of the things you want, but it may not be so easy to determine all of the things that you cannot do without. While you’re swooning over a new home, keep those deal-breakers in mind. Have you fallen in love with a home that has a giant kitchen, but no backyard for your children’s swing set or your herb garden? It’s all about balance when you’re determining what would be nice to have and what you cannot live without.

Get Touchy-Feely Right Away – If you think that you’ve found love at first sight during your home search, don’t be afraid to get a little touchy-feely right from the start. Literally, try out every light switch, appliance, faucet, window, door, etc. etc. etc. By putting your hands all over your potential new home, you can be sure that everything works and that you know HOW everything works.

Do a Double Take – In the home-buying process, love at first sight is great; but, when you find love at second look, home inspection and final walk-through, you’ve likely found a keeper. Don’t skip any of those important steps just because you fall in love with a home during your first tour. After all, once that contract is signed, sealed and delivered… that “summer love at first sight” home is yours for the long term!

If you’re ready to be introduced to some homes that you may be compatible with, contact a Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices The Preferred Realty experienced real estate sales associate today.